How To Effectively Help Your Loved Ones With Shingles Now

Shingles

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What are shingles?

For those providing caregiving help with shingles to an elderly loved one, it’s important to understand what this condition entails. Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection that causes a painful, blistering rash. Shingles are caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. After a person has chickenpox, the virus can remain inactive for years and later reactivate as shingles. Shingles typically begin with a burning or tingling sensation in a specific skin area, often on one side of the body. This is followed by a painful rash that develops into clusters of blisters. The rash can accompany other symptoms, such as fever, headache, and fatigue. The rash usually lasts for two to four weeks, but in some cases, the pain can persist for months or even years after the rash has healed. Proper home care services and support are crucial for managing shingles in an elderly loved one.

Is it a viral disease?

Over the past 25 years, I have had lots of experience with shingles. If you have ever had the chickenpox vaccine, you have the potential to the virus. The development of painful rashes characterizes it. It is a common condition and strikes individuals with a low immune system. It is an infection of the nerves along with the skin around it. The rash forms blisters that typically scab over in 7 to 10 days and clear up within 2 to 4 weeks. Most commonly, the rash occurs in a single stripe around the body’s left or right side. However, the location of the shingles rash can vary. Though shingles can appear almost anywhere on the body, it most commonly affects the torso and the face (including the eyes, ears, and mouth). In addition, it is often present in the ribcage or the waist area. I have even seen it on the back of my uncle.

It can strike individuals at any age.

Shingles can occur at any age, but it is most common in older adults, typically over 50. This is because the risk of developing shingles increases with age, and about half of all cases occur in individuals over 60. However, it’s also possible to get shingles from a younger generation. In addition to age, other factors that can increase the risk of developing shingles include having a weakened immune system, such as due to HIV or cancer, or taking immunosuppressive medications. People who have had chickenpox are also at risk of developing shingles later in life, as the virus can remain inactive in the body for years before reactivating as shingles.

Symptoms of shingles

The symptoms of shingles can vary from person to person but typically begin with pain, tingling, or burning in a specific area of the skin. This is often followed by a rash that develops into clusters of fluid-filled blisters, which can be very painful. Other symptoms of shingles may include:

  • Itching or tingling in the affected area before the rash appears
  • Sensitivity to touch in the affected area
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Swollen lymph nodes

The rash usually appears on one side of the body or face and may occur in a band or stripe. The rash can last for several weeks, and as the blisters heal, they may form scabs. The pain and other symptoms may persist after the rash has cleared, a condition called postherpetic neuralgia. If you suspect that you or someone you know has shingles, you must see a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis and treatment. Shingles can be treated with antiviral medications and other supportive therapies to help manage pain and discomfort. In addition, early treatment can help reduce the severity of symptoms and prevent complications.

 

Shingles Virus Diagram

Tips to help your loved one with shingles

Taking care of our loved ones with shingles is challenging and requires lots of patience and love. Think of these next points as your shingles care package. The agony of itchy blisters and pain makes life difficult for our loved ones. Yet, these tips can help the family caregiver better care for our loved ones with shingles. Shingles can be painful and uncomfortable, and it can be challenging to see your loved ones suffer. Here’s how to support someone with shingles:
  • Encourage them to seek medical treatment:

The varicella-zoster virus causes shingles, and treatment can help manage the symptoms and prevent complications. Encourage your loved one to see a healthcare provider as soon as possible.

  • Help them manage their pain:

Shingles can be excruciating, and your loved one may need help managing their discomfort. Over-the-counter pain medications such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen can help, and your loved one’s healthcare provider may prescribe more vital pain medication if necessary.

  • Be supportive and understanding:

Shingles can be frustrating and debilitating, and your loved one may need emotional support and understanding. Be patient and listen to their concerns.

  • Help them rest and stay comfortable:

Shingles can make it difficult for your loved one to get a good night’s sleep or to be comfortable during the day. Help them find ways to get comfortable, such as by providing extra pillows or a heating pad.

  • Assist with daily activities:

Depending on the severity of their shingles, your loved one may have difficulty performing daily activities such as cooking, cleaning, or driving. Offer to help with these tasks as needed.

  • Help prevent the spread of shingles:

Shingles can be spread to individuals who have not had chickenpox or have not been vaccinated against it, so it’s essential to take steps to prevent the spread of the virus. Encourage your loved one to cover their rash and wash their hands frequently.

  • Stay in touch:

Check in with your loved one regularly to see how they’re doing and offer support. Even a simple phone call or text can make a big difference. Remember that shingles can be frustrating and uncomfortable, but with the proper treatment and support, your loved one can manage their symptoms and fully recover.

One of the most frequently asked questions that caregivers have is:

As a caregiver, why should I encourage my loved one to seek medical treatment?

As a caregiver, it’s essential to encourage your loved one who may have shingles to seek medical treatment for several reasons:

  • Early treatment can help reduce the severity of symptoms and prevent complications:

When shingles are diagnosed and treated early, antiviral medications can help reduce the severity of the infection and prevent complications, such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Early treatment can also help manage pain and discomfort associated with shingles.

  • Proper treatment can help prevent the spread of the virus:

Shingles are contagious and can be spread to individuals who have not had chickenpox or have not been vaccinated against the virus. Encouraging your loved one to seek medical treatment can help prevent the spread of the virus to others.

  • Your loved one may require additional support and care:

Shingles can be painful and uncomfortable, and your loved one may need extra help and care while they recover. Healthcare providers can provide advice and support for managing pain, preventing complications, and promoting healing.

  • Your loved one’s overall health may be affected:

Shingles can be a severe infection, particularly for individuals with weakened immune systems. Encouraging your loved one to seek medical treatment can help ensure their overall health is monitored and managed appropriately. Encouraging your loved one to seek medical treatment is vital in helping them manage their condition and promoting their overall health and well-being.

Care for red rashes and blisters that develop during shingles

If your loved one develops red rashes and blisters during shingles, there are several steps you can take to help care for the affected area and reduce their discomfort:

  1. Keep the affected area clean: Gently clean it with mild soap and water, and pat it dry with a clean towel.
  2. Apply cool compresses: To help reduce inflammation and relieve itching, you can apply cool, damp compresses to the affected area.
  3. Avoid scratching or picking at the blisters: Scratching or picking at the blisters can increase the risk of infection and delay healing. Encourage your loved one to avoid scratching the affected area and keep their nails trimmed short to prevent accidental scratching.
  4. Use topical treatments: Over-the-counter topical treatments, such as calamine lotion or colloidal oatmeal, can help soothe the skin and reduce itching.
  5. Manage pain: Shingles can be a painful condition, and over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can help manage pain and discomfort.
  6. Avoid close contact with others: Shingles are contagious, and the virus can be spread to individuals who have not had chickenpox or have not been vaccinated against the virus. Encourage your loved one to avoid close contact with others until the blisters have scabbed over and healed.

If your loved one’s rash and blisters are severe or do not improve with home care, it’s essential to seek medical attention. Healthcare providers can provide advice on additional treatments, such as antiviral medications, to help manage symptoms and promote healing.

Shingles vaccination

Shingles vaccination is recommended for individuals aged 50 years and older, as it can help prevent shingles or reduce the severity of the infection if it does occur. The shingles vaccine is a live, attenuated vaccine that contains a weakened form of the varicella-zoster virus, which is the virus that causes both chickenpox and shingles.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two shingles vaccines for adults:

  1. Shingrix: This two-dose vaccine is more than 90% effective at preventing shingles and postherpetic neuralgia. The doses are given two to six months apart. Shingrix is recommended for all adults aged 50 years and older, including those who have had a previous case of shingles and those who have received the older shingles vaccine, Zostavax.
  2. Zostavax: This single-dose vaccine is around 51% effective at preventing shingles and about 67% at preventing postherpetic neuralgia. Zostavax is recommended for healthy adults aged 60 years and older who have not had a previous case of shingles.

If your loved one has not yet received the shingles vaccine, it’s essential to speak with their healthcare provider about their eligibility and options for vaccination. The vaccine can help reduce their risk of developing shingles and the risk of complications associated with the infection.

Caregivers can also consider giving alternative treatments for the shingles virus.

While antiviral medications are the primary treatment for shingles, several alternative therapies may help manage symptoms and promote healing. These alternative treatments include:

  1. Calming the skin: Applying cool, moist compresses to the affected area can help reduce itching and inflammation.
  2. Managing pain: Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can help manage pain and discomfort associated with shingles. Topical treatments, such as capsaicin cream, may also provide relief.
  3. Stress reduction: Stress can trigger or worsen shingles outbreaks, so reducing stress through techniques like meditation, yoga, or deep breathing exercises can be helpful.
  4. Natural remedies: Certain natural remedies, such as honey, aloe vera, or coconut oil, may help soothe the skin and reduce itching.

It’s important to note that while these alternative treatments may provide relief from symptoms, they are not a substitute for antiviral medications, which are the primary treatment for shingles. Speaking with your loved one’s healthcare provider before using alternative therapies is essential, as some natural remedies may interact with medications or have side effects.

 

 

After-effects of shingles

After the rash from shingles has cleared, some individuals may experience after-effects, which can include:

  1. Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN): This is a common complication of shingles, where the pain persists for weeks, months, or even years after the rash has healed. PHN can be difficult to treat and significantly affect a person’s quality of life.
  2. Vision problems: Shingles that affect the eye, called ophthalmic shingles, can cause vision problems and even lead to permanent vision loss if not treated promptly.
  3. Skin discoloration: The rash from shingles can cause the skin to become discolored in the affected area. This discoloration may fade over time but can sometimes be permanent.
  4. Scarring: The blisters from shingles can cause scarring in some cases.
  5. Nerve damage: Shingles can cause nerve damage in the affected area, resulting in long-term pain or other complications.

It’s essential to seek medical attention if you develop shingles, as early treatment can help reduce the risk of complications and after-effects. In addition, if you experience persistent pain or other symptoms after the rash has cleared, you must follow up with your healthcare provider for appropriate management.

Conclusion to shingles

It is a painful and annoying condition for our loved ones. But we can help alleviate some effects with patience and tender loving care. Following all the tips mentioned above will help the caregiver and your loved one deal with the shingle virus much more accessible while helping our loved ones recover quickly and easily. For more information, check out this site on shingles. Also, check out my store to learn valuable information on caring for your loved ones. Finally, It can be challenging to attend to your loved one with constipation, but it’s not impossible. With the proper knowledge, you can do this. Remember to care for yourself and keep your business going while caregiving. I’m here to assist you on this journey; schedule your planning session with me so we can look at how to keep your life and your business running smoothly.

 

 

 

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