How Caregivers Handle Different Behaviors in Alzheimer’s Patients

Daughter with mother|How Caregivers Handle Different Behaviors in Alzheimer's Patients

How to handle different behaviors in Alzheimer’s patients

The first thing to remember, Alzheimer’s disease can become a serious problem for caregivers, especially when it comes to difficult and unpredictable behavior. Also, a disease of this kind causes a progressive cognitive decline. As a result, this decline can cause sudden behavioral changes in patients with the disease. Furthermore, severe and unpredictable behaviors can force caregivers to get outside help from home health agencies. Preparation and understanding of such behavioral changes can help the caregivers take care of the elderly in a much better way.

Common behavior patterns of Alzheimer’s patients:

  • Anger outbursts

Alzheimer sufferers may suddenly exhibit anger and physical aggression. This is one of the most common behaviors of such patients. Caregivers must understand that the behavior is not intentional and is happening only because of the disease.

  • Depression and apathy

Many times, Alzheimer patients often lose interest in life and begin feeling listless. They seem to stay depressed more often and exhibit their loss of interest through crying or staying quiet.

  • Insults and complaints

This is one of the most hurtful behaviors exhibited by patients suffering from Alzheimer’s.  Many times patients are locked up in rooms, and this is done for their safety, but they don’t realize why this is being done and therefore react in a very insulting manner.  They may also accuse their caretakers and also their own family members of not taking proper care of them.

  • Wandering

This is yet another serious symptom of Alzheimer patients, due to which leaving them alone at home, can be a frightening idea. The patients often wander in search of someone, or thing they have just imagined.  It may also happen that they need to use the toilet and have forgotten the path to it.  Such factors often compel patients to wander aimlessly.

  • Repetition

Alzheimer’s disease robs one of their brain cells, which was once responsible for memory and thinking. Over a period of time, damaged brain cells cause the patients to keep repeating things over and over again; it can be repetitive actions, word repetition, or even repetition of one particular activity.

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Talking to Your Parent About Giving Up Their Driver’s License

Talking to your parent about giving up their driver’s license Giving up your Driver’s License and aging is a natural phenomenon, and none of us can escape it.  The physical and emotional changes that go with old age are not always natural or pleasant.  Getting older and having health problems can cause problems.   For … Read more

How to Fall and Get Up from the Floor When No One is Around

 

Man fallen on floor|How to Fall and Get Up from the Floor When No One is Around

Assisting the Patient to Fall 

First of all, If you are with a patient who becomes weak or dizzy during a transfer or ambulation, try to ease them down to the floor.  Grasp the patient firm around the waist, using the gait belt if one is available.   Lower the patient to the floor by bending your knees and keeping your back straight.  Do not try to stop a fall because both of you could get injured.

If there is another person in the home, call for help. Check for injuries, and call 911 if necessary. If there are no obvious injuries, help the patient into a comfortable position on the floor. Use pillows, blankets, etc. Allow the patient to rest. You should take a few deep breaths and try to remain calm. Decide if you are able to assist the patient to get up or if you will need extra help.  If you do not feel confident about moving your patient, do not attempt it.  Call for help.

Assisting Yourself to Get Up When No-One is Around

If you have fallen, DO NOT PANIC.  How you respond after the initial fall can create added injuries than the fall itself.  Once you are down, do not try to get up to fast.  Assess the situation to make sure there are no severe injuries.  STAY CALM, breathe easy, and if you are not hurt; then try to get up with these techniques. In conclusion If you are injured, call 911 or yell for help.

 

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How to Take a Blood Pressure Manually

Bloodpressure

    0:00 everyone, it’s Sarah with registered nurse RN. com and today I’m going to go 0:03 over with you how to take blood pressure manually in the hospital 0:07 settings we are blessed because we have automatic blood pressure monitors that 0:11 take her blood pressure is constantly for patients but there are times in … Read more

Emotional Well-being from an Expert

Multiple people showing emotion|Emotional Well-being from an Expert

Importance of Emotions

Here are a few of the reasons our emotions are important in our lives. By the way, emotional intelligence has a good presentation on evolution and emotions.

Survival

Nature developed our emotions over millions of years of evolution. As a result, our emotions have the potential to serve us today as a delicate and sophisticated internal guidance system.  For example, when we feel lonely; our need for connection with other people is unmet. When we feel afraid, our need for safety is unmet. When we feel rejected, it is our need for acceptance that is unmet.

Decision Making

Our emotions are a valuable source of information. Our emotions help us make decisions. Studies show that when a person’s emotional connections are severed in the brain, he cannot make even simple decisions. Why? Because he doesn’t know how he will feel about his choices.

Boundary Setting

When we feel uncomfortable with a person’s behavior, our emotions alert us. If we learn to trust our emotions and feel confident expressing ourselves, we can let the person know we feel uncomfortable as soon as we are aware of our feelings. This will help us set our boundaries, which are necessary to protect our physical and mental health.

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How To Lean About Feeding Your Loved Ones

 

Family eating at the table|How To Feeding Your Loved Ones

Preparing and Feeding your Loved Ones

Feeding your loved one good food is important for good health.  Your goal in preparing food is to promote your loved one’s health.  When you are preparing food, there are a few guidelines that need to be followed. Use cooking methods that will preserve color and taste, as well as vitamins and minerals. Do not add unnecessary ingredients such as large amounts of salt or fats.

Before serving the food, help your loved one to use the bathroom and wash his or her hands, this will help your loved one to have a nice mealtime. Serve foods at the desired temperature, make meals more appealing, pick foods with high nutrients and calories for better taste if the diet allows. Try to offer a variety of meals; no one wants to eat the same thing every day. Always keep your loved one company when they’re eating—it will help them feel more comfortable. Allow them as much time as needed to eat.

Caregiver feeding patient|How To Feeding Your Loved Ones

Feeding your Loved One

Materials Needed

  •  Utensils: knife, fork, and spoon
  •  Dishes, bowls, cup, glass
  •  Napkins (2)
  •  Towel or bib
  •  Straws
  •  Any other special utensils

Procedure

  1. Explain what you are going to do.
  2. Wash your hands.
  3. Obtain the materials listed above.
  4. Prepare your loved one for the meal:
    • Offer to assist with going to the bathroom.
    • Offer to assist your loved one with washing his or her hands.
    • Position your loved one to sit up in the bed or in a chair.
    • Place table or bed tray over your loved one’s lap so he or she can see and reach the food.
  5. Sit near them.
  6. Cut food, butter bread, pour and prepare liquids as needed.
  7. Ask them what he or she would like to eat first.
  8. Encourage them to do as much self-feeding as possible.
  9. Feed your loved one, one bite at a time.   Use a spoon and fill only half-full and according to the ability to chew and swallow.
  10. Alternate solids and liquids.  Use a straw for drinking.
  11. Talk pleasantly with your loved one and encourage them to eat.   Offer praise.
  12. When your loved one is finished, remove their napkin or bib and wipe their mouths.
  13. Wash your loved ones’ hands and face.
  14. Offer oral hygiene.
  15. Make sure your loved one is safe and comfortable.
  16. Wash your hands.
  17. Wash all the dishes used for the meal.
  18. Clean and straighten the kitchen.

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