How Caregivers Use Transfer Aids

 

Aide putting patient in wheelchair|How Caregivers Use Transfer Aids

Transferring patients to a chair/wheelchair 

It is important to realize, Transfer aids are very important to help your loved ones in a wheelchair.  Another key point, once the patient has adjusted to sitting at the side of the bed, they are ready to transfer to a chair or wheelchair. Indicate the patient’s stronger side. Furthermore, be sure to place the chair or wheelchair parallel to this side so that the patient can assist you with the transfer procedure. As a result, always explain what you are going to do and how your patient can help you. Finally, encourage them to do as much as possible to be as independent as possible. Must be remembered, always keep moving.

Safety Tips: Using the Wheelchair 

  • First, place a chair next to the patient’s stronger side before making the transfer.
  • Then, put footrests out of the way before the patient gets in or out a chair.
  • Also, make sure both wheel brakes are locked into position before the patient gets in or out of the chair.
  • As a result, replace footrests in proper position and assist the patient, as needed, to put feet on footrest after being seated.
  • Another key point, make sure that the patient is in a comfortable and safe sitting position before releasing the wheel brakes.
  • Equally important, release both wheel brakes before attempting to move the chair.
  • By all means, make sure that the patient’s clothing or lap blanket does not trail on the floor or become caught in the wheels.

Person holding on to gait belt|How Caregivers Use Transfer Aids

Transfer or Gait Belt

The first thing to remember, a transfer or gait belt is a belt worn by the patient and used by the caregiver to hold on to the patient during a transfer.  As a result, It is used to help support a weak or unsteady patient to move or walk. Finally, apply the belt before beginning the transfer or before assisting the patient in walking.

Procedure for putting on a gait belt

  1. First, explain what you are going to do.
  2. Wash your hands.
  3. Secondly, obtain gait belt.
  4. Assist patient to a sitting position on the side of the bed.
  5. Apply belt over clothing and around the waist.  Never apply over bare skin.
  6. Place belt buckles off center in the front or in the back, for the patients’ comfort.
  7. Tighten belt, using buckles; the belt should not be uncomfortable, cause pain, or cause breathing difficulties.
  8. For the female patient, check that their breasts are not caught under the belt.
  9. Finally, prepare the patient for transfer.

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Wonderful Devices for Ambulation

assistive devices for ambulation

 

Man and woman walkingWonderful Devices for Ambulation

Ambulation 

It is important to realize, the term ambulates means “to move the body by walking with or without assistance.” Another key point, once the patient has tolerated sitting in a chair, the next step is to begin to walk. Also, the physical therapist will instruct the patient and caregiver about any special techniques required and will prepare a schedule for daily ambulation. As a result, your role as the home caregiver is to assist their patient, as needed, making sure that the physical therapist’s directions are followed. Sometimes the patient may want to walk longer than the directions allow. Always follow the physical therapist’s directions.

When assisting your patient to walk, follow these general rules:

  • Assist patient in putting on the gait belt, if needed.
  • Assist patient to the standing position, then count to 10 before proceeding.
  • Stand by the patients’ weaker side and slightly behind.
  • Grasp gait belt in back with one hand while placing another hand in front of collarbone on the weaker side.
  • Do not rush the patient; be patient—allow plenty of time.
  • Practice good body mechanics.
  • If the patient becomes tired, wait a few moments before proceeding.
  • Calmly encourage and reassure the patient, as needed.

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Dealing with Negative Emotions from a Caregiver

    Managing Negative Emotions General Guidelines I have been trying to develop some general guidelines for managing negative emotions.  As a result, here is what I have so far. First of all, identify the feeling. Next, ask if it is a healthy feeling. Then, list your options and choose the one that is most … Read more

Emotional Well-being from an Expert

Multiple people showing emotion|Emotional Well-being from an Expert

Importance of Emotions

Here are a few of the reasons our emotions are important in our lives. By the way, emotional intelligence has a good presentation on evolution and emotions.

Survival

Nature developed our emotions over millions of years of evolution. As a result, our emotions have the potential to serve us today as a delicate and sophisticated internal guidance system.  For example, when we feel lonely; our need for connection with other people is unmet. When we feel afraid, our need for safety is unmet. When we feel rejected, it is our need for acceptance that is unmet.

Decision Making

Our emotions are a valuable source of information. Our emotions help us make decisions. Studies show that when a person’s emotional connections are severed in the brain, he cannot make even simple decisions. Why? Because he doesn’t know how he will feel about his choices.

Boundary Setting

When we feel uncomfortable with a person’s behavior, our emotions alert us. If we learn to trust our emotions and feel confident expressing ourselves, we can let the person know we feel uncomfortable as soon as we are aware of our feelings. This will help us set our boundaries, which are necessary to protect our physical and mental health.

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How To Feeding Your Loved Ones

 

Family eating at the table|How To Feeding Your Loved Ones

Preparing and Serving Food

Your goal in preparing food is to promote your loved one’s health.  When you are preparing food, there are a few guidelines that need to be followed. Use cooking methods that will preserve color and taste, as well as vitamins and minerals. Do not add unnecessary ingredients such as large amounts of salt or fats.

Before serving the food, help your loved one to use the bathroom and wash his or her hands, this will help your loved one to have a nice mealtime. Serve foods at the desired temperature, make meals more appealing, pick foods with high nutrients and calories for better taste if the diet allows. Try to offer a variety of meals; no one wants to eat the same thing every day. Always keep your loved one company when they’re eating—it will help them feel more comfortable. Allow them as much time as needed to eat.

Caregiver feeding patient|How To Feeding Your Loved Ones

Feeding your Loved One

Materials Needed

  •  Utensils: knife, fork, and spoon
  •  Dishes, bowls, cup, glass
  •  Napkins (2)
  •  Towel or bib
  •  Straws
  •  Any other special utensils

Procedure

  1. Explain what you are going to do.
  2. Wash your hands.
  3. Obtain materials listed above.
  4. Prepare your loved one for the meal:
    • Offer to assist with going to the bathroom.
    • Offer to assist your loved one with washing his or her hands.
    • Position your loved one to sit up in the bed or in a chair.
    • Place table or bed tray over your loved one’s lap so he or she can see and reach the food.
  5. Sit near them.
  6. Cut food, butter bread, pour and prepare liquids as needed.
  7. Ask them what he or she would like to eat first.
  8. Encourage them to do as much self-feeding as possible.
  9. Feed your loved one, one bite at a time.   Use a spoon and fill only half-full and according to the ability to chew and swallow.
  10. Alternate solids and liquids.  Use a straw for drinking.
  11. Talk pleasantly with your loved one and encourage them to eat.   Offer praise.
  12. When your loved one is finished, remove their napkin or bib and wipe their mouth.
  13. Wash your loved ones’ hands and face.
  14. Offer oral hygiene.
  15. Make sure your loved one is safe and comfortable.
  16. Wash your hands.
  17. Wash all dishes used for the meal.
  18. Clean and straighten the kitchen.

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We All Need to Eat, So Let’s Learn to Shop for Food

 

Family shopping for food|We All Need to Eat, So Let's Learn to Shop for Food

Shopping for Food 

You are responsible for doing the grocery shopping.   Always keep an organized list in the kitchen and write down things when they are empty.   Include things such as items that are replaced often like milk, bread, soap, and toilet tissue.   Also make sure that you purchase things according to the patient’s diet such as low-sodium, sugar substitute, and low-fat foods.   Be sure to check the pantry and refrigerator often for foods that are no longer good and throw them out. Always read the labels on the foods that are purchased to make sure that they follow along with the patients’ diet guidelines.   Think of food shopping as a challenge. Your goal will be to get the most for your patients’ money by purchasing the best quality, most healthful foods and staying within the food budget.

Terms of Food Products

  • Light or lite—50 percent less fat per serving than the regular product
  • Low fat—3 grams of fat or less per serving
  • Fat-free—less than 1 gram of fat per serving
  • Low cholesterol—20 milligrams or less of cholesterol and less than 2 grams of saturated fat per serving
  • Cholesterol free—2 milligrams or less of cholesterol and 2 grams or less of saturated fat per serving
  • Low calorie—40 calories or less per serving
  • Calorie free—less than 5 calories per serving
  • Reduced or less sodium—25 percent or less than the regular product
  • Light in sodium—50 percent or less than the regular product
  • Low sodium—140 milligrams or less of sodium per serving
  • Very low sodium—35 milligrams or less of sodium per serving
  • Sodium free—5 milligrams or less of sodium per serving
  • High fiber—5 grams of more of fiber per serving
  • Good source—contains 10 percent to 19 percent of the daily value for a certain nutrient
  • High in—contains 20 percent or more of the daily value for a certain nutrient

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